Gloria Copeland

The Firepower of Prayer Ignites Revival Fire - Gloria Copeland 31-jan-2018

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The Firepower of Prayer Ignites Revival Fire - Gloria Copeland 31-jan-2018

Gloria Copeland Sermon - The Firepower of Prayer Ignites Revival Fire (31-jan-2018). Every move of God starts on the altar of prayer because prayer ignites revival fire! Watch Gloria Copeland and Billye Brim on Believer’s Voice of Victory share how prayer and revival fire go hand in hand. When we welcome a spirit of prayer and faith into our lives nothing will be impossible for us!

Full Dialogue  The Firepower of Prayer Ignites Revival Fire

The fire power of prayer ignites revival fire. Join Gloria Copeland and special guest Billye Brim today on the Believer's Voice of Victory, as they show you how every move of God started on the altar of prayer. GLORIA: Hello, everybody. Welcome to the Believer's Voice of Victory. Billye Brim's back with us today. She's got some really good things for us. Hallelujah. BILLYE: Right, Gloria. And I want to take up where we left off yesterday. GLORIA: That's great. BILLYE: I want to talk about the Moravians and the Moravian revival. We're talking about prayer. We're talking about prayer as an incense that sends to the Father a sweet-smelling aroma. And we're talking about the prayers that have preceded the moves of God, the awakenings of God. Not one of them ever came that it wasn't preceded by great and intense prayer.

And one of the groups that prayed and actually, Charles Wesley and John Wesley got saved under their ministry, the Moravians. And you really don't know so much about them. GLORIA: Mm-hmm. BILLYE: I happen to have well, I'll tell you that little story later about my granddaughter's boyfriend. And remind me if I forget to tell you. But I want to tell a little bit more about them here. And from this book, "Fire on the Altar: Those Who Carried the Flame," by Frank "JJ" D-i, and then another word, P-i-e-t-r-o. I'm guessing Di Pietro. GLORIA: Did you bring me one of those books? BILLYE: No, I didn't, honey. And my daughter got it for me, and I think they're going to get you some here. And I know you're going to like it, too. And he spends three chapters talking about the Moravians because they were so they had a prayer meeting that lasted 100 years. GLORIA: That's long. BILLYE: And how the Moravians I'll just do a little GLORIA: Okay. BILLYE: There was this and he was born in ancient Saxony, is what it was called at the time. And it's now, I think, in East Germany. It was has been a time in Austria. But he was born to the Austrian royal family, Count Zinzendorf, and very, very wealthy.

But he loved Jesus from the time he was a child. He made a vow to live for Jesus as his passion GLORIA: Mm. BILLYE: when he was just a child. Six years old and nine years old, he made these vows. And he found a wife that was exactly as devoted as he was. So they took all their fortune they laid aside all their nobility rights and claims, and they took their fortune, they dedicated it to God. And they bought land. They had the money to do it, and they bought parcels huge parcels of the land. And at the time he had bought the land, there came a man to him named Christian David who was representing a group of terribly persecuted people, terribly persecuted by the Roman church. They were the Moravians. They lived in Moravia, Bohemia, someplace else I've forgotten. And because of their beliefs, they believed in new birth, born again, they were terribly persecuted. So this man, Christian David, came to Count Zinzendorf, and he said, "Can some of these people " They're going to be refugees. They're so terribly treated where they are. "Can I get them out and bring them here to live on your land?" And so he did.

Count Zinzendorf called him the Moravian Moses. He went down. He'd get a little group of them at a time, and he'd move them across the borders. And about 300 of them came to live there. And then people heard about it, other persecuted peoples in the area heard about it, and they came there. And there were it was a mixed group, and there were about 600 of them. And some of them didn't agree with the Moravians doctrinally or didn't like their liturgy, or da-da-da-da. So there was this contention. And it's really heartening to me, Gloria, to know that there can be divided groups, and God can get them into one. And Count Zinzendorf, who was such a man of love, and he he had one passion, and his passion was Jesus. He started visiting them in their homes. And he told them, "Start prayer groups." He was a man of prayer, very dedicated prayer. And so he told them, "Start some prayer groups. Invite your neighbors in. You pray here and then one over here and one over here." So they did it. And in five years' time, they became almost selfless. They became so overcome by a spirit of prayer. GLORIA: Praise God.

BILLYE: And he announced, in 1727, "We're all going to get together and have a communion service." So they got together, and they had the communion service. And this communion service, they had the same thing happen, that communion service that happened in the book of Acts. There was a rushing mighty wind. They ran to the windows to see if there was a storm outside. There was not. And then the fire of God fell on them, and they went under the power. Even people far away from them, two of them were working 20 miles away, and at the very same time, the outpouring came on them. It came on those two workers 20 miles away. And they all were under that power. And it was the spirit of prayer that was poured out on them. They all became prostrate on the floor. GLORIA: Praise God.

BILLYE: It is written here in this book which I'm reading, "God had come down to live among them in all of His glory." He wrote about it Zinzendorf wrote about it when he was speaking or he spoke about it when he was speaking to a British audience. "We needed to come to the communion with a sense of the loving nearness of the Savior. On this day, 27 years ago, the congregation of Herrnhut that had assembled for communion were all dissatisfied with themselves. They came to seek the noble countenance of the Savior." GLORIA: Praise God. BILLYE: "In this view of the man of sorrows acquainted with grief, their hearts told them that He would be their patron and their priest who at once changed their tears into oils of gladness and their misery into happiness. This firm confidence changed them in a single moment into a happy people which they are to this day. And they have led many thousands to the heavenly grace once given to themselves." GLORIA: Praise God. BILLYE: It was a young congregation when this outpouring came, the spirit of prayer. Zinzendorf was just 27 years old, and most of the congregation were about that age. And but they were so overcome that then they had to start having three meetings a day, 4:00 a.m., 8:00 a.m., and 8:00 p.m. they had their prayer meetings. "Prayer was the main catalyst that fueled the revival. Zinzendorf, at this time " Now listen to this, Gloria. GLORIA: Okay.

BILLYE: " received a verse from the Holy Spirit which inspired the incredible Moravian 100-year prayer vigil " GLORIA: Oh, my. BILLYE: " that they launched that year." The verse that he received was Leviticus 6:13, which says, quote, "A fire shall always be burning on the altar; it shall never go out." And, of course, that's what the priesthood was told in the Old Testament. On that altar of incense, on that altar of where they offered the sacrifices, the fire must never go out. GLORIA: Praise God. BILLYE: And they saw God gave them that verse because our prayers, Gloria, are offered on the altar. We like Paul said, when you treat them well the people well, you're heaping coals of fire you're praying on the altar for them. GLORIA: Mm. BILLYE: And so that's what our prayers are. They ascend like incense unto God.

And the scripture they got and it lasted them a hundred years. GLORIA: Praise God. BILLYE: "A fire shall always be burning on the altar; it shall never go out." GLORIA: Mm. BILLYE: "Count Zinzendorf knew the fire of the altar signified the prayers of the saints, and he viewed this word as a literal command to restore unceasing prayer before the Lord." You know, the Lord says, "Pray without ceasing." Church history and world history would never again be the same. GLORIA: Praise God.

BILLYE: So they decided they're going to have 24-hour prayer in their prayer tower he had built. So this is this is how it worked: "Two weeks into the revival on August 27, 24 men and 24 women covenanted to pray one hour each day in scheduled prayers. Soon, others enlisted, and before long, all members shared in what became known as the hourly intercession. At home and abroad, on land and sea, this prayer watch ascended unceasingly to the Lord. They recognized the power in the is in the key of the Lord revealed in Leviticus 6. So they decided to accept the task of keeping a continual fire of prayer, intercession, and worship burning before the Lord's presence." I doubt if they realized they would actually keep the fire burning and pure for more than a hundred years. GLORIA: My goodness.

BILLYE: "But they began by making personal commitments to the task. Two men prayed together and two women prayed together for a one-hour watch until the next team arrived to relieve them. This pattern continued around the clock, day after day, week after week, for more than 100 years." GLORIA: A hundred years? They persevered, didn't they? BILLYE: 100 years. "The fervent prayer heat generated by the sacrificial fire of their sustained prayer ignited revival fire that launched their pioneering missionary efforts, and in later years " listen to this. GLORIA: Okay. BILLYE: " helped birth the Great Awakening in America " GLORIA: Praise God. BILLYE: " through their godly influence on men such as John and Charles Wesley and George Whitefield, all who were huge parts of the Great Awakening from which America was birthed. They were influenced by the prayers of the Moravians and by actually meeting the Moravians." GLORIA: Wow. BILLYE: "Was there ever in the whole world of Church history such an astonishing prayer meeting as that which began in 1727, and went on for 100 years?

It was known as the 'hourly intercession,' and it meant that by relays of brothers and sisters, prayer without ceasing was made to God for all the work and wants of His Church. This intense prayer vigil birthed in the hearts of the Moravians a hunger and a passion for the lost. They had 600 saints. And prayer, they saw as a catalyst to revival is as gasoline to a fire. Unlike any movement before or since, the Moravians never stop pouring out their hearts to God. They became literally captured by God Himself and never tired of being His watchmen on the wall. As they matured spiritually, they became increasingly concerned about those who had never heard of the Savior. Six months after the beginning of the prayer watch, Zinzendorf suggested the challenge of a bold evangelism and aimed successfully to reach those in the world from whom 'for whom no one cared.' Before the count could finish speaking, 26 Moravians had stepped forward to go wherever the Lord led." GLORIA: Praise God. BILLYE: Now, missionary evangelism was not known in those days. "This was the beginning of an era of Moravian missionary work which spread to Greenland, Lapland, Russia, Surinam, Guinea, South Africa, Amsterdam, Algeria, the North America Indians, Ceylon, India, Romania, Constantinople (modern Istanbul)."

And they even went to the Atlantic circle and to the Atlantic and Pacific oceans. Now listen to this: "Organized missionary work and world evangelism as we know it today did not exist in the Western world until God lit a fire in the hearts of the Moravians through the watch of the Lord. It was no accident that God restored the fire on the altar first and then ignited a passion for lost souls in the world through prayer." He had ignited that a spirit of prayer fell down on them that day. And in that prayer it wasn't long, only six months, until they had the heart of God for the lost. GLORIA: Praise God. BILLYE: And so they were praying in and whenever Count Zinzendorf said, "We have to do something about the lost," then they had 26 Moravians step forward to say, "We'll go." "And 3:00 a.m. on the morning of August 21, 1732, Count Zinzendorf drove two men in his own carriage to the Copenhagen harbor as they boarded a Dutch ship headed for the West Indies. He blessed them and said, 'Go and do all in the Spirit of Jesus Christ.'" GLORIA: Hmm.

BILLYE: In less than a year, they had sent more than 200 people out. They went out on missionary endeavors. There were no mission boards. There was nothing like this. They just went out because they got this heart for the lost. And they they "were about to enter places go into places that from the beginning of time were controlled by Principalities and Powers. These lords of darkness ruled unhindered for eons, dragging millions of souls into a crisis eternity. So, into this deep darkness, the Moravians came, shining the light of Salvation." "It is a documented fact " listen to this, " that the Moravians would pack their belongings in coffins and then send them ahead so they would have something to ship their bodies back home in.

If they could save one person in a dying world, death mattered not" to them. I mean, they went into places where there were headhunters, where there were, you know, I mean, you're not allowed. They some of them had sold themselves into slavery in certain lands because there was no other way to reach the people in that land, to reach the slaves. They sold themselves into slavery. Now listen to these ones right here: "A New York newspaper reporter was on a ship traveling back to the states after finishing an overseas assignment. On that same ship there just happened to be five Moravian families. The ship came to a stop off a secluded island, and he noticed a distress among the missionaries' families. The wives were crying and holding on tightly to their husbands. The men then knelt in prayer and blessed and hugged their children. The five male missionaries were then lowered into a small skiff and began rowing toward the island. The reporter then understood that the sorrow was caused by everyone saying goodbye until the men could be picked up again when the ship returned. His heart began to sink when, using the captain's spyglass, he read a sign on the beach of the island: 'All are forbidden to enter. Leper colony.'" GLORIA: Oh. BILLYE: "'All who enter this place cannot return.'" And so they left their families to go into the leper colony.

And it tells about the people they saw there. And a man who had no feet, they were eaten off GLORIA: Oh. BILLYE: was carried on the back of a man, and this man was carried on the back he had hands. And the man whose back he rode on, he had he had no hands, but he did have feet. So the two of them went together, and they were sowing crops. GLORIA: Oh, my goodness. What a story. BILLYE: And they brought them they brought them the message of Jesus Christ. GLORIA: My, my. BILLYE: And this all was sustained have you ever gone out, Gloria I do. I go out. And you go out, and Ken. We all go out a lot. But I'm always conscious that back there at Prayer Mountain, they're praying for me. And it seems sometimes, when I go, I kind of like ride along on their prayers, you know?

GLORIA: Mm-hmm. BILLYE: Even sometimes if I'm taking a tour to Israel, I'm teaching all day long, and it seems like sometimes maybe I didn't have as much time to pray that morning, but I know they're praying back there. GLORIA: Praise God. BILLYE: And so Count Zinzendorf, in 1741, he himself went on to the mission field, and he went to North America. Now, you're thinking 1741. We haven't even had 1776 yet. We haven't had the Revolutionary War. And he started a settlement in Pennsylvania, and he called it Bethlehem. And that community was his base for his missionary work among the Indians, and it has now grown into a large city. And my little granddaughter, who Is studying to be a pharmacist, and she has a young man that she's been dating for a few years, and his grandmother invited her to come for Christmas about a couple of years ago. And his grandmother lives in Bethlehem, Pennsylvania, and she's of a Moravian stock. GLORIA: Is that right? BILLYE: And she's a guide in a Moravian museum that they have there in Bethlehem, Pennsylvania. So it was about this time that John Wesley was introduced to the Moravians. He was on a ship bound for America, and it had a group of these Moravians on the ship. Now, he had been to America. He has he's open he wants to mission he wants to minister to the Indians in Georgia, but he's not born again, he's not saved.

And there comes a horrible storm, and it breaks the ship's mast. And all the people are crying out, all the Englishmen are crying out, they're doomed, they're doomed. And here's these Moravians, and they're singing, and they're calm. He was challenged by them. And they were people were offending them. They were treating them terribly, but they never struck back. "And many perceived these German missionaries as cowards until a great storm broke over the ship. As the main sail split and the sea began to pour into the ship, the English panicked, their terrified screams rising above the tumult of the storm, but the Moravians sat quietly, singing their hymns. Afterwards, when one of the Moravians was asked if he was afraid during the storm, he answered, 'I thank God, no.'

Then he was asked if their women and children were afraid and replied, 'No. Our women and children are not afraid to die.' Wesley recorded this in his diary and added, 'From them, I went to their crying, trembling neighbors and pointed out to them the difference in the hour of trial between him that feared God and him that feared not.'" GLORIA: Oh, my. Yeah. BILLYE: "'At twelve, the wind fell. This was the most glorious day which I have hitherto seen.'" And so Wesley then entered into his journal that he went among the Moravians. GLORIA: Praise God. BILLYE: And the Moravians, then, he saw that he had not been born again. And he became "The Wesley brothers were saved and went on to see " GLORIA: So they were saved. BILLYE: They were saved under the Moravian ministry. And they were "saved and went on to see, in meeting after meeting, thousands come to Christ " GLORIA: Praise God.

BILLYE: in the Wesleys' ministries. GLORIA: Praise God. BILLYE: But this had happened because they had come into contact I'm sure God led them into that. And He probably would have led them later into it, you know, but it was the Moravians whom in whom they saw the light of God and in whom they saw salvation by grace through Jesus Christ. GLORIA: Praise God. BILLYE: And then you know what the Wesleys did. GLORIA: Now, are there are there Moravians still here? BILLYE: There are Moravians today. I don't know how many. I do know they have the Moravian museum there in Bethlehem, Pennsylvania, which my granddaughter went to. But that that I wanted to bring out about that part about their prayer. 100 years, they prayed. And let's see, 1727 to 1827, in that prayer tower. And then the missionaries went everywhere. And as a result of their missionary work, which was backed by prayer, the Wesleys got saved. And, man, that's a part that's GLORIA: Awesome. BILLYE: historical fact what happened in the ministries of John Wesley and Charles Wesley. GLORIA: Yes.

BILLYE: And George Whitefield also came into contact he was already born again by the time he was born again before the Wesleys were. And when he was already come into he sought out their fellowship. He sought them out. And everything starts on the altar GLORIA: Yeah. BILLYE: of prayer. There's not a move of God that came, there's not a revival we're going to talk about Azusa tomorrow. GLORIA: Good. BILLYE: Not any of it came without a prayer first. And if we do what they did, we can get what they got. If that's what a man did who brought a great revival out of which Hilo, Hawaii, was born. I'm going to be going there soon. But Hilo became a city because a man who was ministered to in the ministry of Charles Finney, great revivalist and Finney was a man of prayer, and Father Nash who prayed before him. And that young man who was influenced by Finney and his prayer life and his revivals, he said, "If I do what Finney did, I can get what Finney got." And he went to Hawaii, and a great, huge move of God came because he prayed. That's what Finney did. GLORIA: Praise God.

BILLYE: And that's what they all did. And if that's what we'll do, then we can have what they had. GLORIA: Oh, yes. Hallelujah. BILLYE: We can have GLORIA: It's time. BILLYE: Jesus, our passion, but it's going to take prayer GLORIA: Praise God. Glory to God. BILLYE: from the Body of Christ GLORIA: Hallelujah. BILLYE: who is the priesthood on the earth and can lift up GLORIA: Amen, amen. BILLYE: men and nations to God. GLORIA: Billye and I'll be right back. ANNOUNCER: We hope you enjoyed today's teaching from Kenneth Copeland Ministries. And remember Jesus is Lord.

Gloria Copeland Sermon - The Firepower of Prayer Ignites Revival Fire (31-jan-2018). Every move of God starts on the altar of prayer because prayer ignites revival fire! Watch Gloria Copeland and Billye Brim on Believer’s Voice of Victory share how prayer and revival fire go hand in hand. When we welcome a spirit of prayer and faith into our lives nothing will be impossible for us!

Full Dialogue  The Firepower of Prayer Ignites Revival Fire

The fire power of prayer ignites revival fire. Join Gloria Copeland and special guest Billye Brim today on the Believer's Voice of Victory, as they show you how every move of God started on the altar of prayer. GLORIA: Hello, everybody. Welcome to the Believer's Voice of Victory. Billye Brim's back with us today. She's got some really good things for us. Hallelujah. BILLYE: Right, Gloria. And I want to take up where we left off yesterday. GLORIA: That's great. BILLYE: I want to talk about the Moravians and the Moravian revival. We're talking about prayer. We're talking about prayer as an incense that sends to the Father a sweet-smelling aroma. And we're talking about the prayers that have preceded the moves of God, the awakenings of God. Not one of them ever came that it wasn't preceded by great and intense prayer.

And one of the groups that prayed and actually, Charles Wesley and John Wesley got saved under their ministry, the Moravians. And you really don't know so much about them. GLORIA: Mm-hmm. BILLYE: I happen to have well, I'll tell you that little story later about my granddaughter's boyfriend. And remind me if I forget to tell you. But I want to tell a little bit more about them here. And from this book, "Fire on the Altar: Those Who Carried the Flame," by Frank "JJ" D-i, and then another word, P-i-e-t-r-o. I'm guessing Di Pietro. GLORIA: Did you bring me one of those books? BILLYE: No, I didn't, honey. And my daughter got it for me, and I think they're going to get you some here. And I know you're going to like it, too. And he spends three chapters talking about the Moravians because they were so they had a prayer meeting that lasted 100 years. GLORIA: That's long. BILLYE: And how the Moravians I'll just do a little GLORIA: Okay. BILLYE: There was this and he was born in ancient Saxony, is what it was called at the time. And it's now, I think, in East Germany. It was has been a time in Austria. But he was born to the Austrian royal family, Count Zinzendorf, and very, very wealthy.

But he loved Jesus from the time he was a child. He made a vow to live for Jesus as his passion GLORIA: Mm. BILLYE: when he was just a child. Six years old and nine years old, he made these vows. And he found a wife that was exactly as devoted as he was. So they took all their fortune they laid aside all their nobility rights and claims, and they took their fortune, they dedicated it to God. And they bought land. They had the money to do it, and they bought parcels huge parcels of the land. And at the time he had bought the land, there came a man to him named Christian David who was representing a group of terribly persecuted people, terribly persecuted by the Roman church. They were the Moravians. They lived in Moravia, Bohemia, someplace else I've forgotten. And because of their beliefs, they believed in new birth, born again, they were terribly persecuted. So this man, Christian David, came to Count Zinzendorf, and he said, "Can some of these people " They're going to be refugees. They're so terribly treated where they are. "Can I get them out and bring them here to live on your land?" And so he did.

Count Zinzendorf called him the Moravian Moses. He went down. He'd get a little group of them at a time, and he'd move them across the borders. And about 300 of them came to live there. And then people heard about it, other persecuted peoples in the area heard about it, and they came there. And there were it was a mixed group, and there were about 600 of them. And some of them didn't agree with the Moravians doctrinally or didn't like their liturgy, or da-da-da-da. So there was this contention. And it's really heartening to me, Gloria, to know that there can be divided groups, and God can get them into one. And Count Zinzendorf, who was such a man of love, and he he had one passion, and his passion was Jesus. He started visiting them in their homes. And he told them, "Start prayer groups." He was a man of prayer, very dedicated prayer. And so he told them, "Start some prayer groups. Invite your neighbors in. You pray here and then one over here and one over here." So they did it. And in five years' time, they became almost selfless. They became so overcome by a spirit of prayer. GLORIA: Praise God.

BILLYE: And he announced, in 1727, "We're all going to get together and have a communion service." So they got together, and they had the communion service. And this communion service, they had the same thing happen, that communion service that happened in the book of Acts. There was a rushing mighty wind. They ran to the windows to see if there was a storm outside. There was not. And then the fire of God fell on them, and they went under the power. Even people far away from them, two of them were working 20 miles away, and at the very same time, the outpouring came on them. It came on those two workers 20 miles away. And they all were under that power. And it was the spirit of prayer that was poured out on them. They all became prostrate on the floor. GLORIA: Praise God.

BILLYE: It is written here in this book which I'm reading, "God had come down to live among them in all of His glory." He wrote about it Zinzendorf wrote about it when he was speaking or he spoke about it when he was speaking to a British audience. "We needed to come to the communion with a sense of the loving nearness of the Savior. On this day, 27 years ago, the congregation of Herrnhut that had assembled for communion were all dissatisfied with themselves. They came to seek the noble countenance of the Savior." GLORIA: Praise God. BILLYE: "In this view of the man of sorrows acquainted with grief, their hearts told them that He would be their patron and their priest who at once changed their tears into oils of gladness and their misery into happiness. This firm confidence changed them in a single moment into a happy people which they are to this day. And they have led many thousands to the heavenly grace once given to themselves." GLORIA: Praise God. BILLYE: It was a young congregation when this outpouring came, the spirit of prayer. Zinzendorf was just 27 years old, and most of the congregation were about that age. And but they were so overcome that then they had to start having three meetings a day, 4:00 a.m., 8:00 a.m., and 8:00 p.m. they had their prayer meetings. "Prayer was the main catalyst that fueled the revival. Zinzendorf, at this time " Now listen to this, Gloria. GLORIA: Okay.

BILLYE: " received a verse from the Holy Spirit which inspired the incredible Moravian 100-year prayer vigil " GLORIA: Oh, my. BILLYE: " that they launched that year." The verse that he received was Leviticus 6:13, which says, quote, "A fire shall always be burning on the altar; it shall never go out." And, of course, that's what the priesthood was told in the Old Testament. On that altar of incense, on that altar of where they offered the sacrifices, the fire must never go out. GLORIA: Praise God. BILLYE: And they saw God gave them that verse because our prayers, Gloria, are offered on the altar. We like Paul said, when you treat them well the people well, you're heaping coals of fire you're praying on the altar for them. GLORIA: Mm. BILLYE: And so that's what our prayers are. They ascend like incense unto God.

And the scripture they got and it lasted them a hundred years. GLORIA: Praise God. BILLYE: "A fire shall always be burning on the altar; it shall never go out." GLORIA: Mm. BILLYE: "Count Zinzendorf knew the fire of the altar signified the prayers of the saints, and he viewed this word as a literal command to restore unceasing prayer before the Lord." You know, the Lord says, "Pray without ceasing." Church history and world history would never again be the same. GLORIA: Praise God.

BILLYE: So they decided they're going to have 24-hour prayer in their prayer tower he had built. So this is this is how it worked: "Two weeks into the revival on August 27, 24 men and 24 women covenanted to pray one hour each day in scheduled prayers. Soon, others enlisted, and before long, all members shared in what became known as the hourly intercession. At home and abroad, on land and sea, this prayer watch ascended unceasingly to the Lord. They recognized the power in the is in the key of the Lord revealed in Leviticus 6. So they decided to accept the task of keeping a continual fire of prayer, intercession, and worship burning before the Lord's presence." I doubt if they realized they would actually keep the fire burning and pure for more than a hundred years. GLORIA: My goodness.

BILLYE: "But they began by making personal commitments to the task. Two men prayed together and two women prayed together for a one-hour watch until the next team arrived to relieve them. This pattern continued around the clock, day after day, week after week, for more than 100 years." GLORIA: A hundred years? They persevered, didn't they? BILLYE: 100 years. "The fervent prayer heat generated by the sacrificial fire of their sustained prayer ignited revival fire that launched their pioneering missionary efforts, and in later years " listen to this. GLORIA: Okay. BILLYE: " helped birth the Great Awakening in America " GLORIA: Praise God. BILLYE: " through their godly influence on men such as John and Charles Wesley and George Whitefield, all who were huge parts of the Great Awakening from which America was birthed. They were influenced by the prayers of the Moravians and by actually meeting the Moravians." GLORIA: Wow. BILLYE: "Was there ever in the whole world of Church history such an astonishing prayer meeting as that which began in 1727, and went on for 100 years?

It was known as the 'hourly intercession,' and it meant that by relays of brothers and sisters, prayer without ceasing was made to God for all the work and wants of His Church. This intense prayer vigil birthed in the hearts of the Moravians a hunger and a passion for the lost. They had 600 saints. And prayer, they saw as a catalyst to revival is as gasoline to a fire. Unlike any movement before or since, the Moravians never stop pouring out their hearts to God. They became literally captured by God Himself and never tired of being His watchmen on the wall. As they matured spiritually, they became increasingly concerned about those who had never heard of the Savior. Six months after the beginning of the prayer watch, Zinzendorf suggested the challenge of a bold evangelism and aimed successfully to reach those in the world from whom 'for whom no one cared.' Before the count could finish speaking, 26 Moravians had stepped forward to go wherever the Lord led." GLORIA: Praise God. BILLYE: Now, missionary evangelism was not known in those days. "This was the beginning of an era of Moravian missionary work which spread to Greenland, Lapland, Russia, Surinam, Guinea, South Africa, Amsterdam, Algeria, the North America Indians, Ceylon, India, Romania, Constantinople (modern Istanbul)."

And they even went to the Atlantic circle and to the Atlantic and Pacific oceans. Now listen to this: "Organized missionary work and world evangelism as we know it today did not exist in the Western world until God lit a fire in the hearts of the Moravians through the watch of the Lord. It was no accident that God restored the fire on the altar first and then ignited a passion for lost souls in the world through prayer." He had ignited that a spirit of prayer fell down on them that day. And in that prayer it wasn't long, only six months, until they had the heart of God for the lost. GLORIA: Praise God. BILLYE: And so they were praying in and whenever Count Zinzendorf said, "We have to do something about the lost," then they had 26 Moravians step forward to say, "We'll go." "And 3:00 a.m. on the morning of August 21, 1732, Count Zinzendorf drove two men in his own carriage to the Copenhagen harbor as they boarded a Dutch ship headed for the West Indies. He blessed them and said, 'Go and do all in the Spirit of Jesus Christ.'" GLORIA: Hmm.

BILLYE: In less than a year, they had sent more than 200 people out. They went out on missionary endeavors. There were no mission boards. There was nothing like this. They just went out because they got this heart for the lost. And they they "were about to enter places go into places that from the beginning of time were controlled by Principalities and Powers. These lords of darkness ruled unhindered for eons, dragging millions of souls into a crisis eternity. So, into this deep darkness, the Moravians came, shining the light of Salvation." "It is a documented fact " listen to this, " that the Moravians would pack their belongings in coffins and then send them ahead so they would have something to ship their bodies back home in.

If they could save one person in a dying world, death mattered not" to them. I mean, they went into places where there were headhunters, where there were, you know, I mean, you're not allowed. They some of them had sold themselves into slavery in certain lands because there was no other way to reach the people in that land, to reach the slaves. They sold themselves into slavery. Now listen to these ones right here: "A New York newspaper reporter was on a ship traveling back to the states after finishing an overseas assignment. On that same ship there just happened to be five Moravian families. The ship came to a stop off a secluded island, and he noticed a distress among the missionaries' families. The wives were crying and holding on tightly to their husbands. The men then knelt in prayer and blessed and hugged their children. The five male missionaries were then lowered into a small skiff and began rowing toward the island. The reporter then understood that the sorrow was caused by everyone saying goodbye until the men could be picked up again when the ship returned. His heart began to sink when, using the captain's spyglass, he read a sign on the beach of the island: 'All are forbidden to enter. Leper colony.'" GLORIA: Oh. BILLYE: "'All who enter this place cannot return.'" And so they left their families to go into the leper colony.

And it tells about the people they saw there. And a man who had no feet, they were eaten off GLORIA: Oh. BILLYE: was carried on the back of a man, and this man was carried on the back he had hands. And the man whose back he rode on, he had he had no hands, but he did have feet. So the two of them went together, and they were sowing crops. GLORIA: Oh, my goodness. What a story. BILLYE: And they brought them they brought them the message of Jesus Christ. GLORIA: My, my. BILLYE: And this all was sustained have you ever gone out, Gloria I do. I go out. And you go out, and Ken. We all go out a lot. But I'm always conscious that back there at Prayer Mountain, they're praying for me. And it seems sometimes, when I go, I kind of like ride along on their prayers, you know?

GLORIA: Mm-hmm. BILLYE: Even sometimes if I'm taking a tour to Israel, I'm teaching all day long, and it seems like sometimes maybe I didn't have as much time to pray that morning, but I know they're praying back there. GLORIA: Praise God. BILLYE: And so Count Zinzendorf, in 1741, he himself went on to the mission field, and he went to North America. Now, you're thinking 1741. We haven't even had 1776 yet. We haven't had the Revolutionary War. And he started a settlement in Pennsylvania, and he called it Bethlehem. And that community was his base for his missionary work among the Indians, and it has now grown into a large city. And my little granddaughter, who Is studying to be a pharmacist, and she has a young man that she's been dating for a few years, and his grandmother invited her to come for Christmas about a couple of years ago. And his grandmother lives in Bethlehem, Pennsylvania, and she's of a Moravian stock. GLORIA: Is that right? BILLYE: And she's a guide in a Moravian museum that they have there in Bethlehem, Pennsylvania. So it was about this time that John Wesley was introduced to the Moravians. He was on a ship bound for America, and it had a group of these Moravians on the ship. Now, he had been to America. He has he's open he wants to mission he wants to minister to the Indians in Georgia, but he's not born again, he's not saved.

And there comes a horrible storm, and it breaks the ship's mast. And all the people are crying out, all the Englishmen are crying out, they're doomed, they're doomed. And here's these Moravians, and they're singing, and they're calm. He was challenged by them. And they were people were offending them. They were treating them terribly, but they never struck back. "And many perceived these German missionaries as cowards until a great storm broke over the ship. As the main sail split and the sea began to pour into the ship, the English panicked, their terrified screams rising above the tumult of the storm, but the Moravians sat quietly, singing their hymns. Afterwards, when one of the Moravians was asked if he was afraid during the storm, he answered, 'I thank God, no.'

Then he was asked if their women and children were afraid and replied, 'No. Our women and children are not afraid to die.' Wesley recorded this in his diary and added, 'From them, I went to their crying, trembling neighbors and pointed out to them the difference in the hour of trial between him that feared God and him that feared not.'" GLORIA: Oh, my. Yeah. BILLYE: "'At twelve, the wind fell. This was the most glorious day which I have hitherto seen.'" And so Wesley then entered into his journal that he went among the Moravians. GLORIA: Praise God. BILLYE: And the Moravians, then, he saw that he had not been born again. And he became "The Wesley brothers were saved and went on to see " GLORIA: So they were saved. BILLYE: They were saved under the Moravian ministry. And they were "saved and went on to see, in meeting after meeting, thousands come to Christ " GLORIA: Praise God.

BILLYE: in the Wesleys' ministries. GLORIA: Praise God. BILLYE: But this had happened because they had come into contact I'm sure God led them into that. And He probably would have led them later into it, you know, but it was the Moravians whom in whom they saw the light of God and in whom they saw salvation by grace through Jesus Christ. GLORIA: Praise God. BILLYE: And then you know what the Wesleys did. GLORIA: Now, are there are there Moravians still here? BILLYE: There are Moravians today. I don't know how many. I do know they have the Moravian museum there in Bethlehem, Pennsylvania, which my granddaughter went to. But that that I wanted to bring out about that part about their prayer. 100 years, they prayed. And let's see, 1727 to 1827, in that prayer tower. And then the missionaries went everywhere. And as a result of their missionary work, which was backed by prayer, the Wesleys got saved. And, man, that's a part that's GLORIA: Awesome. BILLYE: historical fact what happened in the ministries of John Wesley and Charles Wesley. GLORIA: Yes.

BILLYE: And George Whitefield also came into contact he was already born again by the time he was born again before the Wesleys were. And when he was already come into he sought out their fellowship. He sought them out. And everything starts on the altar GLORIA: Yeah. BILLYE: of prayer. There's not a move of God that came, there's not a revival we're going to talk about Azusa tomorrow. GLORIA: Good. BILLYE: Not any of it came without a prayer first. And if we do what they did, we can get what they got. If that's what a man did who brought a great revival out of which Hilo, Hawaii, was born. I'm going to be going there soon. But Hilo became a city because a man who was ministered to in the ministry of Charles Finney, great revivalist and Finney was a man of prayer, and Father Nash who prayed before him. And that young man who was influenced by Finney and his prayer life and his revivals, he said, "If I do what Finney did, I can get what Finney got." And he went to Hawaii, and a great, huge move of God came because he prayed. That's what Finney did. GLORIA: Praise God.

BILLYE: And that's what they all did. And if that's what we'll do, then we can have what they had. GLORIA: Oh, yes. Hallelujah. BILLYE: We can have GLORIA: It's time. BILLYE: Jesus, our passion, but it's going to take prayer GLORIA: Praise God. Glory to God. BILLYE: from the Body of Christ GLORIA: Hallelujah. BILLYE: who is the priesthood on the earth and can lift up GLORIA: Amen, amen. BILLYE: men and nations to God. GLORIA: Billye and I'll be right back. ANNOUNCER: We hope you enjoyed today's teaching from Kenneth Copeland Ministries. And remember Jesus is Lord.

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